Painting Miniatures

Thursday, September 8, 2022

It is fun to say that I was born in the 1900s, and one of the things we did as kids was paint miniatures. These are tiny statues, if you will, of people and monsters often associated with Dungeons & Dragons, but also for historic military dioramas or other gaming hobbies. Back in the day, ours was made of pewter (and probably lead before that); today they are in much higher detail and made of plastic. Anyway, Boy decided to get back into painting them and challenged me to a contest of skills. I can’t say I was that good at it many moons ago, being as young as I was when introduced to the craft by my uncle, but over the years I have certainly developed other art skills. Boy, on the other hand, use to paint them fairly well, yet hadn’t practiced art in ages. Who would win this duel? We were both confident it would be ourselves, of course.

Boy selected a trio of pre-primed Grungs and bought a starter kit of acrylic paints by Vallejo. The image at the grung link shows very high detail, but the grey pre-primer removed a lot of it in reality (if it really is even there in the plastic). Plus, the seams are very noticeable. Boy has since bought minis from other companies, and currently his favorite is Reaper Bones USA, unprimed, which allows him to put only a very light layer of black primer so as not to lose the detail, and without the clunky seams.

I painted the grung with the blowpipe. I like to envision the action and setting before I start painting, so my little grung is running through a forest, twisting as she runs, to dart something off to her right. She’s carrying a case of more blow darts in her hand, and a bow and quiver of arrows on her back. She’s in pretty formalized armor, to boot.

I mixed in a wee bit of metallic paint so her skin has a beautiful shimmer, though that isn’t captured well by my photography. Most of her skin is shimmery with a very faint silver, but then I added a stronger golden touch to highlight her forehead, hands, and feet. You’ll have to imagine that. I also added just enough silver to her black eyes so they shine.

Boy painted the little green grung with a dagger and the orange one crouching on a vined wall, bow at the ready. It was this latter one that we really noticed a flaw in the pre-primer because it was so difficult to tell what was skin versus armor. Plus, the arrow was bent (a problem often with pewter minis, through they could be straightened out unlike plastic; of course, pewter also breaks, unlike plastic…)

Boy’s learning about color theory with mixing paints (knowledge I apparently take fully for granted), and I’m learning that the days of needing cheater glasses are approaching. Wah wah. Boy uses a lighted magnifying glass I bought for a stitching project way back when. I mean, look at this iphone pic I took before completely finishing: these things are smol.

We both agree that I won the painting contest as far as skill goes, but after I painted this one, I wasn’t really feeling up to any more as I had predicted. Like any painting I’ve done, while I may be good at it, I just don’t like it. (But why?! … ) So, I give Boy the trophy, since he really loves painting them. Determination and motivation are harder skills to obtain than hand dexterity, after all!

The little hobbit girl is from a set with a baby dragon that Boy hasn’t finished yet (I started the dragon and abandoned it in favor of other projects, realizing once again that painting isn’t my jam). The mage is from Reaper Bones USA, and is definitely a nicer mini. These two, plus the orange grung, are still a little bit in progress but finished enough that I wanted to showcase them here. Boy’s so into it that I think I will have to give him a little corner of my craft room! 😀

 

See more posts related to:

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Looking for more cases of the Crafties?
Stitch Club: Steel-Jessop

Stitch Club: Steel-Jessop

As part of TextileArtist.org’s Stitch Club, I made a map of Guy Gavriel Kay’s Sarantium (by Martin Springett) following Bridget Steel-Jessop’s workshop.

read more
Kintsugi stones

Kintsugi stones

I used a kintsugi kit by Jack Richardson to meld two broken stones back together.

read more
Hexie Dreams 16

Hexie Dreams 16

I have a total of 107 flowers ready for my fussy-cut EPP Hexie Dreams quilt and am moving on to planning how to arrange them.

read more
Eternal napping in the sun

Eternal napping in the sun

You can stop here if you don’t wish to read anything sad today. It’s already bad enough with Roe v. Wade, war, and such, I know.

read more
Stitch Club: Goodwin

Stitch Club: Goodwin

As part of TextileArtist.org’s Stitch Club, I followed Valerie S. Goodwin’s workshop to create a map of one of my favorite places.

read more
Hexie Dreams 15

Hexie Dreams 15

For my fussy-cut EPP Hexie Dreams quilt, I’ve so far stitched together fifty seven flowers.

read more
Ukrainian Whitework

Ukrainian Whitework

In 2020, my embroidery guild offered a class on Ukrainian whitework: the Summer Lace pattern in all white by Terri Bay. Of course, this was well before the war occurring now. My friend, then, had recently gone to Ukraine to meet her father's side of the family for the...

read more
Hexie Dreams 14

Hexie Dreams 14

I’ve begun sewing the hexies together for my fussy-cut EPP Hexie Dreams quilt.

read more
Hexie Dreams 13

Hexie Dreams 13

All the hexies are prepped now for my Hexie Dreams fussy-cut English Paper Piecing quilt.

read more
Hexie Dreams 12

Hexie Dreams 12

Thirty more hexies have been prepped for my Hexie Dreams fussy-cut English paper piecing quilt. I’m either ready to start piecing them together, or just a few more to go – time will tell what I decide!

read more
Stitch Club: Pattullo 2

Stitch Club: Pattullo 2

As part of TextileArtist.org’s Stitch Club, I followed Mandy Pattullo’s workshop to create a textile collage bird.

read more
Hexie Dreams 11

Hexie Dreams 11

I’ve added 141 more hexies to my Hexie Dreams fussy-cut English paper piecing quilt, putting me well over the original goal.

read more
Stitch Club: McVetis

Stitch Club: McVetis

As part of TextileArtist.org’s Stitch Club, I created an abstract motherboard using techniques from Richard McVetis.

read more
#52tagshannemade 52

#52tagshannemade 52

I am participating in Anne Brooke’s #52tagshannemade #sew4thesoul slow stitch challenge for 2021. Week 52’s theme is making a little tree.

read more
#52tagshannemade 51

#52tagshannemade 51

I am participating in Anne Brooke’s #52tagshannemade #sew4thesoul slow stitch challenge for 2021. Week 51-s theme was to create a wreath.

read more
#52tagshannemade 50

#52tagshannemade 50

I am participating in Anne Brooke’s #52tagshannemade #sew4thesoul slow stitch challenge for 2021. Week 50’s theme was to add some circles.

read more
#52tagshannemade 49

#52tagshannemade 49

I am participating in Anne Brooke’s #52tagshannemade #sew4thesoul slow stitch challenge for 2021. Week 49’s theme was to catch a memory, though I went a bit off pitch.

read more
#52tagshannemade 48

#52tagshannemade 48

I am participating in Anne Brooke’s #52tagshannemade #sew4thesoul slow stitch challenge for 2021. Week 48’s was to use a sheaf stitch as a fill.

read more
#52tagshannemade 47

#52tagshannemade 47

I am participating in Anne Brooke’s #52tagshannemade #sew4thesoul slow stitch challenge for 2021. Week 47’s theme was to create a little birdie.

read more