introduction

Thursday, January 1, 2009
As my first entry, I should probably explain what the goal is here, eh?

I like being crafty and decided to make a record of my doodads, with links to the main materials I used or places of inspiration (fellow crafters, buildings that inspire me, ancient art, etc). I hope to also include basic explanations of what I did. I don’t pretend to be an expert, but that is what going public is – to learn from others how to achieve the creations that I so covet. I want to record my accomplishments and errors both, because they are all learning experiences.

I dont know what my crafting niche is, but I like scrapbooking a lot. I love graphic design for its skill in pleasing arrangements. And I am quite lucky enough to possess the Cricut Expression. I find the Xyron machines with the permanent adhesive paper to help, too, in many cases (I have the Xyron 250 and 1200). I also fiddle with polymer clay, which is still a skill in its infancy. I come from a family of quilters, and have tried my hand at one or two and hope to sew some more. Lately, I have been exploring the wonderful world of embroidery. I collect all sorts of discarded items that I see potential in. Whether they ever become anything other than someone else’s trash is not the point. The point is they somehow inspired my train of thought to create. It’s an inherited packratting ability that I currently justify.

In an educational passion sense, I dig anthropology. Hence my nick name (Australopithecus + Chic design;) While I might highlight some cool anthro things, the connection here is really one of art and art history. I am fascinated by ancient art. Not only in a material sense – some are whimsical, most are mysterious – but also in a philosophical sense. What drove their imagination? How did they practice? What did their mistakes look like?

I truly hope to do a lot here, and should that be the case, you will see the influences of anthropology in my work, specifically when dealing with clay. You may also note some video game influences – I would qualify the artists of the Zelda games as anthropologically awesome, for instance. The statues are wonderful! (The absolute most anthropologically awesome game is Sphinx and The Cursed Mummy!) The fantasy medieval era is also where my heart fancies most, so a castle or two should not surprise you.

I have a back-burner hope to one day turn my “projects” into “products” but only time will tell.
You’ll find tags for easy searching. Links to my most recent projects. Links to my ever-growing catalogue of inspiration. Links to old and done projects. And a way to contact moi, should you ever so chose.

Thanks for your future patronage!

-CaLynn

 

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